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October 2016

Honoring the Memories of a Lifetime

Around The Town Enewsletter

 

Cremation: The Biggest Trend In The Funeral Industry

Memories of a Lifetime” Program Offers Holiday Grief Support

Navigating The Art Of Condolences

Our History

Historical Figures Salute


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Cremation: The Biggest Trend In The Funeral Industry


Funeral TrendsAs with any societal behavior, funerals have seen their share of trends and changes over the years. The most recent trend with funerals is the increasing prevalence of cremation. Cremation has been around for centuries as an option for final disposition, but it wasn’t until the last decade that the U.S. started to see an increase in the number of people choosing this option.

 

Most archaeologists believe cremation first became a funeral practice during the Stone Age, around 3000 B.C. It was believed to be the most common method of final disposition in Greece and Rome between 800 B.C. and 600 B.C. Although widespread in some parts of the world, cremation wasn’t initially accepted by all societies or faiths. Christians shunned cremation, considering the practice pagan. Additionally, the early Jewish culture preferred sepulcher entombment, in which the deceased was placed in a small room cut out of rock or built of stone.

 

In 1886, the Catholic Church went so far as to officially ban cremation. Church members were even excommunicated for arranging a cremation. As an alternative, it was proposed that people use “cementation” instead of cremation. With cementation, the body would be encased in a block of cement, which would take the place of a coffin and vault for burial. Cementation, didn’t interfere with rituals of the church, but never really caught on.

 

It wasn’t until the 1960’s that the Catholic Church began permitting cremation; as long as it didn’t demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body. Many Catholics still prefer a traditional burial, but the number of cremations happening today is on the rise. The change in church policies mirror some of the reasons the more people are choosing cremation.

 

Some believe that cremation is a more ecological choice, since it doesn’t necessarily require burial in a cemetery. Fewer families are staying in the same town they were born in, so having family plot in the local cemetery is declining. Other reasons include more options for a final resting place such as scattering ashes or a burial at sea.

 

Currently, cremation is the choice of approximately 48% of people in the U.S. and it is estimated that by 2020 that percentage will be more than half of the population. Now that more people understand that cremation is just an option for final disposition and that they can still have a traditional funeral or memorial service, undoubtedly, this is one funeral trend that will continue to rise.

 

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"Memories of a Lifetime"
Program Offers Holiday Grief Support

Find Your Holiday Cheer Again After Losing a Loved One

Creating Memories Of A Lifetime Holiday Seminar

If you are suffering from the recent loss of a loved one, the upcoming holidays may no longer seem as festive. Buch Funeral Home wants to help you regain the hope of the holidays, by offering a special program to help you better understand and cope with grief and loss in the midst of the holiday season.
 
This is a free program open to anyone who is dealing with the loss of a loved one. The event is led by Deborah Gonzalez, MSW, of Pathways Center for Grief & Loss, Hospice & Community Care. “Creating Holiday Memories of a Lifetime” will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at 2:00pm at Enck’s Banquet & Conference Center. Reservations can be made by calling Aaron at 665-4341.
 
The Creating Holiday Memories program is presented in a supportive and confidential environment and will include helpful ideas on ways to effectively cope. Presentations by Pathways Center and Buch funeral directors will share ideas that families can use to create their own memorials for loved ones. All participants of the program will receive resource materials on handling grief along with a special thank you gift. Refreshments will also be served.

 

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Navigating The Art Of Condolences

 

Navigating The Art Of CondolencesWe have all found ourselves in a situation where we want to offer condolences but are at a complete loss for words.  Not knowing what to say is completely normal, but knowing that doesn’t solve the problem. How do you figure out how to express your sympathy in a supportive way? Here are a few tips you can follow when you find yourself in a situation like this. 


1. Express your lack of words
It is completely OK to let the other person know that you are at a loss for words. Saying so can be far more caring and helpful to the person grieving for a number of reasons. It lets them know that they aren’t the only one struggling with understanding why this has happened and it also means they don’t have to listen to someone else saying they are “in a better place” or “she was so perfect, God wanted her right next to him.” These statements may mean well but they are very hard to hear if you are grieving the loss of the person.

 

2. Share a positive memory
By sharing a memory about the person who died, you are offering a new part of that person to the griever. Hearing stories reminds people their loved one had an impact on the world and they won’t be forgotten.

 

3. Remember it isn’t about you
As a way of connecting with the grieving person and to show them that you share some of their grief, we often make the loss about us. Comments like, “I was shopping when I heard,” “I couldn’t sleep all night,” “I haven’t stopped crying,” doesn’t help the other person. Express your sympathy but do your best to remain neutral.

 

4. Be real
There is no need to launch into a lengthy monologue express your sympathy and sorrow. Grievers hear the same phrases and speeches over and over, so it’s okay to sometimes be blunt. A simple, “this sucks” can be a welcome relief and ring truer.

 

5. Check in…later
Remember there is no time limit on grief which means there is no time limit on sympathy either. Many mourners are overwhelmed and possibly still in shock immediately following a death. Getting back to normal life afterward can be particularly difficult so a card, phone call or visit a few weeks or months after are often especially appreciated.  


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Our History

 

Buch History


The Buch Family of Funeral Homes has a long history in the community. Our roots date back to all the way to 1861 during the Civil War. We have had ties to funeral homes in New Holland, Lancaster, Bethlehem and now Mount Joy, Manheim, and Lititz. It has been our pleasure to serve this community for so long and look forward to being a part of it for many years to come.


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Historical Figures Salute

 

Jonas SalkJonas Salk was a physician and medical researcher credited with discovering and developing the first safe and effective vaccine for polio, while working at the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine.

 

Salk’s ambitious research over a seven-year period heralded him as a miracle worker when the success of his vaccine was released in 1952. Later, he founded the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California where he spent his life researching and writing. His last years were spent searching for a vaccine for HIV.

In 2015, Salk was featured on a one-dollar U.S. coin honoring the March of Dimes.

 

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