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February 2015

Honoring the Memories of a Lifetime

 February 2015 - Around The Town Enewsletter

 

The Importance of Rituals

Grief in the Workplace

Circle Of Friends Provides Support

How The Millennial Generation Deals With Loss

 

The Importance of Rituals
“When words are inadequate, have a ritual.” - Anonymous

CandlesOur deepest thoughts and feelings are often expressed through symbolic activities. Weddings, birthday parties and other celebrations allow us to share important life events with each other. 


Funerals, too, are ways for us to celebrate a person’s life and provide closure to loved ones. The funeral is an important part of the grieving process.


Noted educator and grief counselor Dr. Alan D. Wolfelt, explains that funerals help us to meet the reconciliation needs of the mourning process.

Funerals can help us develop a new self-identity. You may no longer be fulfilling the role of a mother, father, son or daughter. A funeral is the beginning of your acknowledgement - and the acknowledgement of others - that you are accepting a new identity, without the person you have lost.

While we don’t have all of the answers, a funeral reinforces the fact that dying is a natural and unavoidable process. Funerals demonstrate the importance of our beliefs and values and allow us to convey them. They may also help strengthen our faith and beliefs.

Perhaps most importantly for some, funerals have become central gathering places for mourners. This physical - often demonstrative - show of caring and support is one of the most significant healing aspects of the funeral ritual.

Everyone handles their grief in their own way, but having support and the comforting ritual of a funeral service can help us move towards coming to terms with our loss.
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Grief in the Workplace

Empty DeskGrief is a very personal experience, but often there are times when our personal and professional lives intersect. The death of a co-worker or that of a co-worker’s loved one is a good example of when we may be called upon for added support, understanding and patience.

Supporting a fellow employee can make a huge difference in how they accept their loss. Being there can truly help them transition back into a more normal existence, one of which work, plays an important role. Your presence may be appreciated at the funeral, especially if it is in your local area, but your support will also be needed when your co-worker returns to the workplace. It is important to remember that grief is a journey, and there may be times during the workday when the grieving employee may need some additional time, a private moment or someone to listen.

Being that person can make the office a more welcoming environment for them and an easier place to return to a structured existence. Some people are unsure what is acceptable in times of sorrow, but you should reach out to your co-worker and let them know you were sorry to hear of their loss. If you are only somewhat acquainted with the person or don’t know them at all, join with others in the office to send flowers or a personal card.

If You are a Manager or Supervisor
Now is not the time to assign new responsibilities or make big office changes. Make sure that the employee is aware of any employee assistance programs that are available and work with the person if they are in need of a work schedule that is temporarily more flexible.  Depending on the nature of the death or the relationship to others in the office, consider offering the help of a grief counselor or therapist who can benefit anyone who has been affected.

If You Lose a Co-Worker
When a fellow employee dies, everyone in the office is faced with grief.  Some people may react with guilt or anger; others with depression or sadness.  Our professional colleagues become like an extended family to many of us, and during some weeks, we may be spending more time with them than our own spouses and children.  Recognize that you will experience grief, and seek out the help of a counselor if you need help to work through it.

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Circle Of Friends Provides Support

Circle of Friends LogoWe understand that your grief is a journey, and that after funeral services are over and the initial shock of losing a loved one passes, you still need support. For that added support after the funeral, we encourage you to sign up for our Circle of Friends program.

Circle of Friends will provide you with a monthly grief and recovery newsletters via email.  The newsletters are full of stories, poems and inspirational quotes to help you through a difficult time.


The program will be in place for a full year after your loss.  Buch Funeral Home appreciates your privacy and we would never sell your email address to any third party vendor.  We believe this program will be a valuable resource as you work through the grieving process.
Click here to sign up for our Circle of Friends program.

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How The Millennial Generation Deals With Loss

TechnologyIt is no secret that there has always been differences between the generations.  Music, attire, food choices, philosophies, politics have all been unique to different generations. This is also true for how each generation deals with death.

The most recent generation, Millennials, who began to reach adulthood after 2000, are trying to make sense of the inevitability of death and the figure out what is acceptable etiquette that accompanies it.

Millennials, for the most part, have lived their entire lives with technology. They were born into a world already filled with the internet and email, graduated college using computers and work adeptly on devices of all shapes and sizes. This infusion of technology into everyday life has changed how many of them view death - from sharing the news, to the funeral ritual itself.

In their world, Facebook, Twitter and other social media are their main way of communicating with their friends. So, it’s only natural that they use those same means of communication to share the news of a death.

A good example is the mother of a young woman who died suddenly of an asthmatic reaction. She wanted to ensure that her daughter’s friends knew of her passing. She ended up posting the news on her daughter’s Facebook page, because she knew people would see it there. The mother acknowledged that in the past, this method of announcing a death would be unheard of.

Young people also use texts and technology to share details and memorialize their loved ones. Because everyone is now equipped with a camera, photos at funerals are no longer uncommon occurrences. In other words, technology is helping young people share their grief and work through their own loss.

Technology has changed the way we do many things, so it is not out of the question to think that it can change the way we approach death. It is important, though, that you do what feels most comfortable to you and what, in your opinion, is respectful in honoring your loved one.

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Everyone handles their grief in their own way, but having support and the comforting ritual of a funeral service can help us move towards coming to terms with our loss.